Series Board

Chris Andersen
Chris Andersen

Chris Andersen is Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and is currently the Director of the Rupertsland Centre for Métis Research. He is the author of two books: (with Maggie Walter) Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Indigenous Methodology (Left Coast Press, 2013) and “Métis”: Race, Recognition and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood (UBC Press, 2014). With Evelyn Peters, he also co-edited Indigenous in the City: Contemporary Identities and Cultural Innovation (UBC Press, 2013). Andersen was a founding member of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Executive Council. He is a member of Statistics Canada’s Advisory Committee on Social Conditions and is editor of the journal aboriginal policy studies. He was recently named to the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

Irene Watson
Irene Watson

Irene Watson belongs to the Tanganekald and Meintangk First Nations Peoples.  Watson is Professor of Law at the University of South Australia Law School. She has published extensively in the area of colonialism and First Nations Law and has worked as a legal practitioner and an advocate within international fora. The focus of her scholarship and practice is working in relation to country, and it includes the recording, recovery, and survival of traditional language place names, oral histories, and language. Currently Watson is working on an ARC Discovery Indigenous Award Fellowship Project, “Indigenous Knowledges, Law, Society and the State.” Recent publications include Aboriginal Peoples, Colonialism and International Law: Raw Law (Routledge, 2015).

Emilio del Valle Escalante
Emilio del Valle Escalante

Emilio del Valle Escalante is a K’iche’ Maya scholar from Guatemala and Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His teaching and research focus on contemporary Latin American literatures and cultural studies, with particular emphasis on Indigenous literatures and social movements, Central American literatures and cultures, and postcolonial and subaltern studies theory in the Latin American context. His broader cultural and theoretical interests cluster around areas involving themes of colonialism in relation to issues of nationhood, national identity, race/ethnicity and gender. He is the author of Maya Nationalisms and Postcolonial Challenges in Guatemala: Coloniality, Modernity and Identity Politics (School for Advanced Research Press, 2009; Spanish edition by FLACSO, 2008). He is also editor of “Theorizing Indigenous Literatures” (a special issue of A contracorriente, 2013), U’k’ux kaj, u’k’ux ulew: Antologia de poesia Maya guatemalteca contemporanea (IILI, 2010), “Untying Tongues: Minority Literatures in Spain and Latin America” (with Alfredo Sosa Velasco, a special issue of Romance Notes, 2010), and “Indigenous Literatures and Social Movements in Latin America” (a special issue of Latin American Indian Literatures Journal, 2008). Del Valle Escalante’s articles may be found in such venues as Revista de Crítica Literaria Latinoamericana, Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Mesoamerica, Studies in American Indian Literature, Revista Iberoamericana, Latin American Caribbean and Ethnic Studies, Procesos: Revista Ecuatoriana de Historia, and Revista de Estudios Interétnicos.

Kim TallBear
Kim TallBear

Kim TallBear is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is enrolled in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and is also descended from the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. In 2012–13 she was a Donald D. Harrington Fellow at the University of Texas. She studies how genomics is co-constituted with ideas of race and indigeneity. Her book, Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science (University of Minnesota Press, 2013), is the culmination of ten years of research on the politics of human genome diversity research involving Native American and other Indigenous peoples. She is now investigating how Indigenous biological scientists in the United States manage tensions between scientific and Indigenous cultures and traditions. She is interested in the role of Indigenous scientists in the democratization of bio-scientific fields, and in their potential role in the development of scientific governance within tribes. Most recently, she has become interested in the overlap between constructions of “nature” and constructions of “sexuality,” including as they are analyzed within burgeoning queer ecologies and multispecies ethnographies literatures. She brings Indigenous thought to indigenize these approaches to sex and nature. TallBear has published research, policy, review, and opinion articles on a variety of issues related to science, technology, environment, and culture in anthologies and journals including Social Studies of Science; Science, Technology & Human Values; Aboriginal Policy Studies; Current Anthropology; The Journal of Law Medicine, and Ethics; Science; Wicazo Sa Review; International Journal of Cultural Property; and Indian Country Today. She blogs on science, technology, and Indigenous issues at www.kimtallbear.com.